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59 Cards in this Set

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prose
what we write and speak every day, without meter or ryme
fiction
story, novel
non-fiction
autobiographical
satire
not genre-a mode
manifistation of authorial attitude (tone) and purpose
mode
elements of which can be found in any category of literature--from poetyr and drama to novels and essays
roman
short for romance, novel in european countries
exposition
introduction
complication
novel problem
static characters
do not change in significant ways, that is in ways which relation to the story which is structuring the novel.
dynamic characters
may change only slightly in his attitudes, but those changes may be the very ones upon which the narrative rests.
protagonists
struggles toward or for someone or something
antagonists
struggles against someone or something
stock
character that exists because the plot demands it
stereotype
character w/out individuating characteristics
foils
characters enabling us to see other characters better
allegorical
characters standing for qualities or concepts rather than for actual personages
motif
a detail or element of the story which is repeated throughout, and which may even become symbolic
setting
where and when of the story
how
author's style
speculative essay
looks at ideas, explores them rather than explains them
argumentative essay
to present a point and provide evidence, which may be factual or anecdotal and to support it
expository essay
explain and clarify ideas
voice
narrator's tone, but author is speaking. in fiction-narrator is speaking not author
thought
distinguishes non-fiction from fiction. uses to present an idea
irony
inversion or reversal, doing or saying the opposite of the unexpected
parody
a humorous or satirical imitation of a serious piece of literature or writing
inversion
reversal of the usual or natural order of words; anastrophe.
hyperbole
1.
obvious and intentional exaggeration.
2.
an extravagant statement or figure of speech not intended to be taken literally, as “to wait an eternity.”
understatement
A form of irony in which something is intentionally represented as less than it is: “Hank Aaron was a pretty good ball player.”
sarcasm
harsh or bitter derision or irony.
wit
speech or writing showing such perception and expression.
invective
1.
vehement or violent denunciation, censure, or reproach.
2.
a railing accusation; vituperation.
3.
an insulting or abusive word or expression.
verse
line of poetry
stanzas
a grouping of lines w/ a metrical order and often a repeated rhyme (rhyme scheme)
end rhyme
rhyming at end of line
internal rhyme
includes at least one rhyming word within the line, often for the purpose of speeding the rhythm or making it linger
slant rhyme
jolts a reader who expects a perfect rhyme, poets thus use such a rhyme to express disappointment or a deliberate let-down.
masculine rhyme
uses one-syllable words or stresses the final syllable of a polysyllable words, giving the feeling of strength and impact
feminine rhyme
uses a rhyme of two or more syllables, the stress not falling upon the last syllable, giving a feeling of softness and lightness
free verse
unrhymed and varying in metrical pattern
blank verse
unrhymed but has strict rhythm
meter
the pattern or measure of stressed or accented words within a line of verse
iambic rythm
rising and falling rythm
iambic meter
poetry that alternates stressed and unstressed syllables
iambic pentameter
a line of poetry w/ ten syllables or rising and falling stresses
foot
basic measuring unit in a line of poetry
iambic foot
one unstressed syllable followed by a stressed marked by a U
monometer
one foot
pentameter
five feet
hexameter
six feet
diometer
two feet
trimeter
three feet
tetrameter
four feet
heptameter
seven feet
octameter
eight feet
personification
object that is being personified-capitalized
metaphor
compares two unlike things, feelings, or objects
simile
compares two dissimilar things but always use the words "as if" (for a clause) or "like"
allusion
a passing or casual reference; an incidental mention of something, either directly or by implication: an allusion to Shakespeare.