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5 Cards in this Set

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F­01 Describe the role of the RBT in the service delivery system.

An RBT is most often on the “front line”. That is, they are working most directly with clients and surrogates in the implementation of the behavioral intervention. Because they are most often seen by both the clients and parents/surrogates, RBTs often have a more developed rapport with parents than any other behavior professional. Because of this frequent contact it is important to do two things:


1. Relay relevant information to your supervisor about the level of support from caregivers and the progress of the client.


2. To develop and maintain a rapport with clients and their families that facilitates the inclusion of all stakeholders, especially your supervisor’s involvement.

F­02 Respond appropriately to feedback and maintain or improve performance accordingly

It is aversive for many to hear criticism. Although it may be difficult, however, criticism should always be constructive and meant to assist you in making improvements to your service delivery that will ultimately benefit the ultimate beneficiary of behavioral services. Your supervisor should allow you the opportunities to receive training and practice in order to meet expectations.

F­03 Communicate with stakeholders (e.g. family, caregivers, other professionals) as authorized.

When communicating to stakeholders, it is important to retain the understanding of your role as the behavioral services provider. Do not attempt to suggest changes to the intervention plan or discuss issues that should be referred to your supervisor. Again, your supervisor is the person who is ultimately responsible for ensuring that the services that you provide are true­ to­ plan and completed correctly.

F­04 Maintain Professional boundaries (e.g. avoid dual relationships, conflicts of interest, socialmedia contacts).

The professional and ethical code (section 1.06) deals with this very topic. Multiple or dualrelationships involve a professional relationships and some other kind of relationship (e.g.,friendship, romantic, family or business relationships other than the behavioral service that youare hired for. It is important to maintain professionalism by avoiding these conflicts of interest.Do not accept gifts or allow working closely with one another to become a relationship in whichprofessional and friendship boundaries are difficult to define. Instead, maintain only aprofessional relationship, as others can endanger the client ­centered model.

F­05 Maintain client dignity

Maintaining client dignity has much in common with communicating respect for the client andrespect for confidentiality. Share client information only with clients, caregivers and yoursupervisor ­unless requested to do so in compliance with legal or ethical obligations.Communicating respect for the client, in general, means that you treat clients as you would anyrespected member of the community and maintain care and patience.