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64 Cards in this Set

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Hence! Home you idle creatures, get you home! / Is this a holiday? What know you not, / Being Mechanical, you ought not walk / Upon a laboring day without the sign / Of your profession?-Speak, what trade art thou? / 1.1.1-5
Flavius
Where is thy leather apron and thy rule? / What dost thou with thy best apparel on?- / You sir what trade are you?
Marullus
A trade,sir, that I hope I may use with a safe / conscience, which is indeed ,sir, a mender of bad / soles./
Cobbler
Wherefore rejoice? What conquest brings he home? / What tributaries follow him to Rome / To grace in captive bonds his chariot wheels? / You block , you stones , you worse than sensless / things!
Marullus
O you hard hearts, you cruel men of Rome, Knew you not Pompey? Many a time and oft Have you climbed up to walls and battlements, To towers and windows , yea, to chimney tops, Your infants in your arms, and there have sat The livelong day, with patient expectation, To see great Pompey pass the streets of Rome. And when you saw his chariot but appear, Have you not made an universal shout, That Tiber trembled underneath her banks To hear the replication of your sounds Made in her concave shores?
Marullus
And do you now but on your best attire? And do you now cull out a Holiday? And do you now strew flowers in his way That comes in triumph over Pompey's blood?
Marullus
Be gone! Run to your houses, fall upon you knees, Pray to the gods to the intermit the plague That needs must light on this ingratitude
Marullus
Go, go good country men and for this fault Assemble all the poor men of your sort Draw them to the tiber banks and weep your tears Into the channel , till the lowest stream Do kiss the most exalted shores of all
Flavius
See whe er their basest mettle be not moved. They vanquish tongue-tied in their guiltiness. Go you down that way towards the Capitol. This way will I. Disrobe the images If you find them decked with ceremonies.
Flavius
I'll about And drive away the vulgar from the streets; So do you too, where you percieve them thick. These growing feathers plucked from Caesar's wing Will make him fly an ordinary pitch, Who else would soar above the view of men And keep us all in servile fearfulness.
Flavius
These growing feathers plucked from Caesar's wing Will make him fly an ordinary pitch, Who else would soar above the view of men And keep us all in servile fearfulness
Flavius
The barren, touched in this holy chase, shake off their sterile curse

WHo , to whom and about
Who: Caesar
To Whom: Antony
About: Calpurnia
I shall remember. When Caesar says "Do this" it is performed.
Antony
Who is it in the press that calls on me? I hear a tongue shriller than all the music Cry "BLANK." Speak. BLANK is turned to hear.
Caesar
When is the Ides of March?
March 15th
I am not gamesome. I do lack some part Of that quick spirit that is in BLANK. Let me not hinder,BLANK2, your desires. I'll leave you
WHo: Brutus
BLANK: Antony
BLANK2: Cassius
You bear to stubborn and strange a hand. Over your friends that love you
WHo: Cassius
to whom: Brutus
`Be not decieved. I f I have veiled my look, I turn the trouble of my countenance Merely upon myself. Vexed I am Of late with passions of some difference, Conceptions only proper to myself, Which give some soil , perhaps , to my behaviors.
Brutus
Than that poor BLANK , with himself at war, Forgets the shows of love to other men.
Brutus
No , BLANK , for the eye sees not itself But by the reflection, by some other things
Brutus
BLANK: Cassius
1.2.60-68
Cassius
1.2.57
Cassius
Were I a common laughter, or did use To stale with ordinary oaths my love To every new protestor; if you know That I do fawn on men and hug them hard And after scandal them , or if you know that I profess myself in banqueting To all the rout , then hold me dangerous
Cassius
What means this shouting? I do fear the people Choose Caesar for their king
Brutus
What is i that you would impart on me? If it aught toward the general good Set honor in one eye and death i' th' other And I will look on both indifferently; For let the gods so speed me as I love The name of honor more than I fear death.
Brutus
I had as lief not be as live to be In awe of such a thing as myself. I was born free as Caesar ; so were you; We both have fed as well and we can both Endure the winter's cold as well as he.
Cassius
I as Aenea , our great ancestor, Did from the flames of Troy upon his shoulder The old Anchises bear, so from the waves of Tiber Did I the tired Caesar. And this man Is now become a god, and Cassius is A wretched creature and must bend his body If Caesar carelessly but nod on him.
Cassius
How he did shake. "Tis true, this god did shake. His coward lips did from their color fly, And that same eye whose bend doth awe the world Did lose luster.
Cassius
Why, man , he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs and peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves.
Cassius
Men at some time are masters of their fates. The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
Cassius
Age, thou art shamed! ROme, thou hast lost the breed of nobl bloods! When went there by an age since the great flood, But it was famed with more than with one man? When could they say till now , that talked of Rome , That her wide walks encompassed but own man?
Cassius
Now it is Rome indeed , and room enough When there is in it but only one man. O, you and I have heard our fathers say There was a Brutus once that would have brooked Th' eternal devil to keep his state in Rome As easily as a king
Cassius
That you do love me , I am nothing jealous. WHat you would work me to , I have some aim. How I have thought of this and of these times recount hereafter. For this present I would not, so with love I might entreat you, Be any further moved. What you have said , I will consider ; what you have ti say I will with patience hear, and find time Both meet to hear and answer such high things.
Brutus
Brutus had rather be a villager Than to repute himself a son of ROme. Under these hard conditions as this time Is like to lay upon us.
Brutus
The angry spot doth glow on Caesar's brow And all the rest look like a chidden train. Calphurnia's cheek is pale and Cicero looks with such ferret and fiery eyes As we have seen him in the capitol, Being crossed in conference with some senators.
brutus
Let me have men about me that are fat........

Who and to who,
Caesar to Antony
He reads much , He is a great observer , and he looks Quite through the deeds of men. He loves no plays, As thou dost, Antony; he hears no music Seldom he smiles , and smiles in such as sort As if he mocked himself and scorned his spirit. That could be moved to smile at anything.

WHO AND ABOUT WHO
Caesar

about: Cassius
Such men as he be never at heart's ease Whiles they behold a greater than themselves, And therefore they are very dangerous.

WHO AND ABOUT WHO
Caesar

about: Cassius
Why, there was a crown offered him and being offered him he put it by with the back of his hand , thus and then the people fell a-shouting.
Talking: Casca
About: Caesar
'tis very like; he hath the falling sickness
WHo: Brutus
About: Caesar
No caesar hath it not ; but you and I And honest Casca , we have the falling sickness
Cassius
I know not what you mean by that , but I am sure Caesar fell down. If the rag tag people did no clap him and hiss him , according as he pleased and displeased them , as they use to do the players in the theater ; I am not true man.
Casca
But those that understood him smiled at one another and sook their heads. But for mine own part, it was Greek to me. I could tell you more news too : Marullus and Flavius, for pulling scarves off Caesar's images are put to silence.
Casca
What a blunt fellow is this grown to be! He was a quick mettle when he went to school
About: casca
Talking: Brutus
So he is now in execution Of any bold or noble enterprise, However he puts on this tardy form. This rudeness is a sauce to his good wit, Which gives men stomach to digest his words WIth better appetite.
Talking : Cassius
About: Casca
Well Brutus thou art noble . Ye tI see Thy honorable mettle may be wrough From that it is disposed.....
Cassius
Therefore it is meet That noble minds keep ever with their likes; FOr who so firm that cannot be seduced?
Cassius
Are you not moved, when all the sway of earth Shakes like a thing unfirm? O' BLANK , I have seen tempests when the scolding winds Have rived the knotty oaks and I have seen Th' ambitious ocean swell and rage and foam To be exalted with the threat'ning clouds;
Casca to Cicero
But never till tonight, never till now Did I go through a tempest dropping fire. Either there is a civil strife in heaven, Or else the world , too saucy with the gods, Incenses them to send destruction
Casca to Cicero
Who sees : Common slave with hand on fire , lion in streets, women saying they saw men on fire down the streets and an owl screeching?
Casca tells Cicero
When these prodigies Do so conjointly meet , let not men say ,"These are their reasons, they are natural," For I believe they are portentous things Unto the climate that they point upon
Casca to Cicero
But men may construe things after their fashion
Cicero to Casca
A very pleasing night to honest men
Cassius to Casca
For my part , I have walked about the streets , Submitting me unto the perilous night, And thus unbraced, BLANK, as you see , Have bared my bosom to the thunder-stone ; And when the cross blue lightning seemed to open The breast of heaven , I did present myself Even in the aim and very flash of it.
Cassius to Casca
It is the part of men to fear and tremble When the most mighty gods by tokens send Such dreadful heralds to astonish us
Casca to Cassius
You are dull BLANK and those sparks of life That should be in A roman you do want Or else you use not.
Cassius to Casca
You look Pale and gaze, ANd put on fear, and cast yourself in woner, To see the strange impatience of the heavens. But if you would consider the true cause Why all these things change from their ordinance, to monstrous quality - why you shall find That heaven hath infuse them with these spirits To make them instruments of fear and warning Unto Some monstrous state.
Cassius to Casca
For Romans Have thews and limbs like to their ancestors. But woe the while , our fathers' minds are dead, And we are governed with our mothers' spirits. Our yoke and sufferance show us womanish.
Cassius to Casca
I know where I will where this dagger then; BLANK from bondage will deliver BLANK. Therein, you gods you make the weak most strong. Therein you gods, you tyrants do defeat.
Cassius to Casca
But life being weary of these worldly bars, Never lacks power to dismiss itself. If I know this , know all the world besides That part of tyranny that I do bear I can shake off at pleasure
Cassius to Casca
I know that he would not be a wolf But that he sees the Romans are but sheep
Cassius to Casca
But , O greif , Where hast thou lead me? I perhaps sepeak this Before a willing bondman,; then I know My answer must be made. But I am armed And dangers are to me indifferent.
Cassius to Casca
And the complextion of the element In favor's like the work we have in hand, Most bloody , fiery and most terrible.
Cassius to Casca
O ,he sits high in all the people's hearts , And that which would appear offense in us His countenance , like richest alchemy, Will change to virtue and to worthiness
Casca to Cassius