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26 Cards in this Set

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1. suited to the time, place, or occasion

2. negotiation between organized workers and employers on wages, hours, conditions, and benefits

3. a tenant farmer who pays a share of his crop as rent for his land
1. APROPOS
2. COLLECTIVE BARGAINING
3. SHARECROPPER
Roosevelt was Secretary of the Navy under President Wilson.
FALSE
Franklin Roosevelt served two terms as a state senator.
TRUE
President Roosevelt had been governor of the state of New Jersey.
FALSE
What were six similarities of the two Roosevelts?
1. BOTH RAN FOR VICE PRESIDENT

2. BOTH WERE ASSISTANTS TO THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY

3. BOTH WENT TO COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL

4. BOTH ATTENDED HARVARD

5. BOTH BECAME PRESIDENT

6. BOTH HAD PHYSICAL HANDICAPS
Roosevelt's New Deal grew out of the ideas of which two presidents?
THEODORE ROOSEVELT

WOODROW WILSON
How did Roosevelt's ideas on the nation's economic problems differ from previous presidents?
IF THE PRIVATE SECTOR COULD NOT SOLVE THE PROBLEMS THAN GOVERNMENT WOULD
What was the effect of Roosevelt's famous phrase, "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself"?
It uplifted the morale of the country throughout his administration.
President Roosevelt began his New Deal by initiating his First Hundred Days program.
true
Roosevelt's informal radio talks were called "fireside chats."
true
The Social Security Act, passed in 1933, provided for corporation health programs for employees to be handled by the corporations.
false
1. prevented panic withdrawals

2. work relief for states

3. equality for farm prices

4. improved business ethics

5. electrical power and soil conservation
1. EMERGENCY BANKING ACT

2. FEDERAL EMERGENCY RELIEF ACT

3. AGRICULTURE ADJUSTMENT ACT

4. NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL RECOVERY ACT

5. TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY
President Roosevelt's foreign policy was similar to that of Woodrow Wilson's.
TRUE
Roosevelt's Good Neighbor Policy did not fare well.
FALSE
President Roosevelt was not concerned with most minorities.
FALSE
Suited to the time , place , and occasion.
APROPOS
Negotiation between organized workers and employees on wages , hours , conditions , and benefits.
COLLECTIVE BARGAINING
A tenant farmer who pays a share of his crop as rent for his land.
SHARECROPPER
The famed saying, "Now is the time for all good men to come to the aid of their country" was never more apropos than during the early 1930s. Franklin Delano Roosevelt was very well prepared for the job. His political career gave him valuable experience and helped him to function with great confidence and efficiency as president of the United States.
THE FOUNDER OF THE NEW DEAL
Being a distant cousin of former president Theodore Roosevelt gave Franklin Roosevelt's name an image that commanded respect. His father, James Roosevelt, was a wealthy railroad man. Franklin Roosevelt had private tutors until he was fourteen years old. He spent a great deal of time in outdoor activities such as fishing, bird-watching, and livestock farming. Two of his hobbies were collecting model ships and stamps. Roosevelt's outgoing personality and inner confidence continued to grow through his careful training during his childhood in Hyde Park, New York.
After graduating from Groton School in Massachusetts, young Franklin entered Harvard University where he spent four productive years. Roosevelt was editor of the school's newspaper, an experience that served him well during his political career. After Harvard, Roosevelt graduated from Columbia University Law School in 1907 and began private practice with a law firm in New York.

The future president was elected as a Democratic state senator in New York
HIS PERSONAL PREPARATION
Franklin Roosevelt's thinking was undoubtedly influenced by his father. James Roosevelt was a Democrat with conservative tendencies and had been a diplomat under President Grover Cleveland. He influenced his son to develop courage and positive decision-making skills. James Roosevelt strongly emphasized the principle of not allowing special-interest groups to force one into making decisions. This background laid the foundation for his son's political career.

Another person who heavily influenced Franklin's outlook on life was his distant cousin, Theodore Roosevelt, who was also from New York. Theodore Roosevelt was the twenty-sixth president of the United States. In addition to both men becoming presidents, both were outdoorsmen and continually returned to estates in New York for recreation and relaxation during their careers. Both men had physical handicaps; Franklin's was polio, Theodore's was asthma.

Theodore and Franklin had private tutors while growing up and were taught to work hard and to give fair a
HIS PERSONAL PHILOSOPHY
Before he was elected president, Franklin D. Roosevelt had promised the people a New Deal. The New Deal was a set of policies that was produced from the ideas of Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson and was mixed with Franklin Roosevelt's own philosophy. The New Deal promised that injustices within the business and financial communities would be controlled, and agriculture and labor groups were promised more welfare relief. Roosevelt's New Deal was not a radical move to socialism as some claimed, but was rather a shift toward a more middle-ground course of action.
THE PROGRAM OF THE NEW DEAL
Roosevelt's plan was to distribute the nation's abundance broadly to those in need. He determined that if the private sector would not find a way to solve the nation's economic problems, then the government would solve them. In his first inaugural address, Roosevelt began his psychological attack on the Depression with his famous phrase, "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself." This phrase was to become a source of encouragement to the nation throughout the Roosevelt administration. In his address, Roosevelt called for strict control of banking and credit, a work project that would employ many jobless citizens, and a Good Neighbor Policy in world affairs.
PRACTICAL PROMISES
The people of the United States needed the encouragement Roosevelt's talk gave. Their response to his words was overwhelmingly positive; they were ready to accept the challenge for discipline, duty, and a return to values of high morality. Many people believed that the nation had fallen into evil ways in the 1920s and was now reaping what it had sown.

In President Roosevelt's New Deal, the emphasis was to build from the bottom up, not from the top down. The key to the program was the hard-working common American. Farmers, small banks and businesses, and average homeowners were among those who would be helped. Tariff reduction would also be sought to encourage international trade. Roosevelt declared publicly that he was going to try bold experiments; if one experiment did not work, he would attempt another.

To carry out the details of his New Deal, Roosevelt carefully selected a cabinet of competent people. Much of the success of his plan depended on the loyalty and hard work of these individuals. They had
THE ONE BEFORE CONTINUED ...
President Roosevelt intended to put his plans for national recovery into immediate action. As soon as his term in office began, Roosevelt initiated his First Hundred Days program. This program stressed passing as much legislation as soon as possible; any legislative action at all was better than the economic standstill the nation was experiencing.

One of the first things Roosevelt did as president was to get Congress to pass the Emergency Banking Act. This act prevented panic withdrawals of funds from banks by the public. The act also called for the banks to close, be evaluated by the government, and reopen only if approved as being fiscally sound.

President Roosevelt gave the first of his famous "fireside chats" on March 12, 1933. He assured the people that their money would be safer "...in a reopened bank than under the mattress." The president's efforts caused people to regain confidence in the nation's banking system and to stop hoarding money. A steady flow of money began to return to most banks. Only
POSITIVE ACTION
In the 1930s, many people had only enough money to buy food. They were unable to secure automobiles, a college education, or medical and dental services. In some areas of the nation, people paid bills with produce and personal items.

President Roosevelt's New Deal specifically dealt with the plight of minorities in the United States, especially African Americans, Mexican Americans, and Native Americans. The New Deal for minorities was administered by such individuals as Harold Ickes, former president of the Chicago Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, and Eleanor Roosevelt, the president's wife.

Some of their goals for improved conditions were to cut down the unemployment level of African Americans, to help the thousands of farm tenants and sharecroppers who lost their land, to help minorities receive better wages, and to improve the living conditions of migrant workers.

President Roosevelt's foreign policy was similar to that of Woodrow Wilson's. Roosevelt sought wor
1930'S