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10 Cards in this Set

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What are the strengths of Parliament as a law maker?
-It is an elected and representative body
-It responds quickly to the demands for change in the law
-It makes law in futuro
-It can delegate its power
It makes laws in futuro. Why is this a strength?
This is a strength because Parliament does not have to wait for problems to arise; it can anticipate the needs of the community, now and into the future, and act in a way to resolve entire areas of law.
It can delegate its power. Why is this a strength?
This is a strength because Parliament is able to deal with more important community matters and leave the formation of delegated legislation to bodies that have the time, expertise, resources and training. For example, allowing specific road rules to be made by VicRoads, who understands the needs of society and communities.
It is an elected and representative body. Why is this a strength?
This is a strength because members of Parliament are elected to office. The laws they make should be representative of the views and values of the community, otherwise they may not be re-elected at the next election.
It responds quickly to the demands for a change in the law. Why is this a strength?
This is a a strength because Parliament has the power to respond to community demands for change by updating, whenever the need arises, existing areas of legislation or whole areas of the law. For example, providing more powers to police to keep the streets of Melbourne safe.
What are the weaknesses of Parliament as a law maker?
-It is often influenced by lobbyists and other pressure groups
-It is difficult to legislate in politically sensitive areas.
-Delegated authorities are not democratically elected
-The process of law making can be manipulated if both Houses of Parliament are controlled by Government
The process of law making can be manipulated if both Houses of Parliament are controlled by Government. Why is this a weakness?
This is a weakness because the Government does not necessarily need to listen to the views of the community. It is able to pass its legislation without the effective review that would normally be provided by the other house.
Delegated authorities are not democratically elected. Why is this a weakness?
This is a weakness because other than local councils, which are elected, there are many subordinate authorities making laws. This in turn undermines the democratic principle of representative government on which our parliamentary system is structured.
It is difficult to legislate in politically sensitive areas. Why is this a weakness?
This is a weakness because parliament may find it difficult to make laws that have strong values or interest groups, and politicians may be concerned with an electoral backlash. For instance, both the federal and state parliaments have passed laws granting same-sex couples equal rights except for marriage.
It is often influenced by lobbyists and other pressure groups. Why is this a weakness?
This is a weakness because well organised groups that can make a lot of noise can influence government policy that represents a particular viewpoint, such as gay and lesbian lobby groups for same-sex marriage.